Saturday, August 24, 2013

Support the Summit Street Garden’s Flower Power Bulb Sale!


Tulips and daffodils in the Summit Street Community Garden this spring.
Planning on buying bulbs this fall? Support the Summit Street Community Garden with our bulb sale! Simply purchase bulbs through this FlowerPower link, and 50 percent of proceeds will go to the garden. Though the garden is maintained completely by volunteers, the money goes toward tools, plants, water, gas for the outdoor grill and other materials.
The sale is going on now through Oct. 30, 2013. The online selection includes a variety of daffodils, crocuses, hyacinths and tulips, as well as alliums, irises, lilies, guinea hen flowers, buttercups and perennial geraniums. Or choose from the spring or rock garden collections. Orders of $40 or more receive 10 free Tête-à-Tête daffodils!
If you’re in the area, please stop by our Bluegrass/Blues Bulb Bake Sale Bonanza on Sept. 28 from 9:30 am–4:30 pm, with live music and baked goods for sale, as well as the opportunity to buy bulbs. The rain date is Sept. 29.
More about the Summit Street Community Garden
The Summit Street Community Garden under construction.
In the fall of 1993, neighborhood volunteers began moving trash and rubble from an abandoned lot at the corner of Summit and Columbia streets, and by the following autumn, the seeds for the Summit Street Community Garden were sown, both literally and figuratively. Still tended by volunteers, the garden features a border of shade trees, native plants, flowers and various plantings, including a peach tree and two grapevines—one over an arbor and the other along the Summit Street fence. In the spring, you’ll find two crabapples in bloom, as well as forsythia, tulips, daffodils, crocus and hyacinths. 
Summit Street Community Garden today.
 In late summer, you’ll see an array of blooms, including zinnias, elephant ears, coneflowers, nasturtium and hydrangea in borders and in members’ boxes. In the plots along the brick paths, you’ll also find an array of vegetables and herbs, including tomatoes, sage, rosemary and basil. Take a seat at the bench by the garden’s entrance, in the arbor-shaded patio or at the umbrella table. The garden also has a carefully-tended compost area for garden clippings. Everyone is welcome when the gates are open and during garden hours: Wednesday from 6:30–8 pm, Saturday from 10 am–2 pm and Sunday from noon–4 pm. Those interested in becoming a member can attend a garden meeting or work day and receive an orientation.

1 comment:

  1. Really good post! Hope there will be more good post here!Thanks for sharing valuable information.solar power

    ReplyDelete